breadysmith
I know there are a number of you out there who use Sparks as surrounds.  I wanted to see if anyone uses them in a manner like the link below with them firing upward.

http://www.gr-research.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=113

For those with far more experience than I, does this type of placement produce a better non-directional surround field than a dipole would?  Then has anyone by chance tried this out with some Sparks.  My room is small enough that I need to either use a dipole or try out this format, a Spark radiating directly at me would be a bit much for the people on the end of my seating.  If anyone has any experience in this area I'd very much appreciate the input.  Thanks in advance.


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Mark_Seaton
breadysmith wrote:
I know there are a number of you out there who use Sparks as surrounds.  I wanted to see if anyone uses them in a manner like the link below with them firing upward.

http://www.gr-research.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=113

For those with far more experience than I, does this type of placement produce a better non-directional surround field than a dipole would?  Then has anyone by chance tried this out with some Sparks.  My room is small enough that I need to either use a dipole or try out this format, a Spark radiating directly at me would be a bit much for the people on the end of my seating.  If anyone has any experience in this area I'd very much appreciate the input.  Thanks in advance.


It could work, but I wouldn't recommend this use as the coaxial tweeter has a little too narrow dispersion vs. the small dome tweeter.  "Matching" with dipole designs is a rather fuzzy concept to begin with, and this might be a case where a different speaker is warranted until we bring out a shallow mounted variation or a wide dispersion design arraying 2 coaxes horizontally (of course this will cost more than a single driver unit).

The way to handle the side seating that is close to a surround with the coaxial design is to use the well controlled off axis to our benefit.  If you fire the coaxial straight out from the wall or with a small down angle from above ear level, everyone is off axis to some degree, but the closest listeners are much further off axis.  The higher the speaker, the further off axis the closest listener.  The mid/high frequencies will be reduced further off axis and help reduce the increased level from being closer to the speaker.


Mark Seaton
Seaton Sound, Inc.
sales@seatonsound.net
773-290-8436
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breadysmith
Thanks for the input Mark..it's much appreciated.  I hadn't considered the coaxial and its dispersion characteristics at all.  I think the way you mention using the Sparks would work and keep them mounted high enough that not having a grill designed for them just yet could keep them safe from toys ending up down the port holes. 
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breadysmith

Sorry to resurrect an old thread but I had another question about surrounds that I hope someone could address.  So based on the info that Mark provided in the previous post, if I had 2 rows spaced about 6 feet apart, would it be wise to do two pair of side surrounds with each Spark placed 90-110 degrees relative to the row of seating?  Or can I get away with just a standard 7.1 set-up with 2 side surrounds.  Whether I go with 2 pair of side surrounds or not, I'd do rear surrounds.  Not sure if that would change anything or not.  Any input would be appreciated. 

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