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KevinD
Awesome!

Thanks buddy!

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ccarnel
Hmmmm... wonder if those are mine!
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audioguy
Love those.  Wished I had waited before buying custom Sound Anchor Stands.  While I suspect mine are sturdier (built out of steel), they sure don't look that cool.
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sandbagger
I dont think I would bet on that

They can be filled with sand or shot.....

audioguy wrote:
Love those.  Wished I had waited before buying custom Sound Anchor Stands.  While I suspect mine are sturdier (built out of steel), they sure don't look that cool.
Kevin
Motor City Custom Audio
http://motorcitycustomaudio.com/
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audioguy
R u just trying to make me feel worse
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audioguy
Just ordered two.  I now have some very solid Sound Anchor Stands custom built for the Catalyst for sale.

I can resist everything but temptation !! 

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audioguy
I am going to sell my custom made Sound Anchor Catalyst stands.  If you want structural integrity and rigidity but the cosmetics are less important (e.g. the speakers are behind a screen), these steel stands are perfect for you.  I paid $800 plus shipping and am selling for $440 plus shipping.  They have threaded holes on the bottom for the included spikes (which have steel disc available for protecting wooden floors).

See my ad on Audiogon





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gpburns


you just want everybody to droll over the Dunlavy
what a majestic speaker
Gary
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audioguy
gpburns wrote:
you just want everybody to droll over the Dunlavy
what a majestic speaker


Majestic is a good word.  And they sound spectacular as well.  Which indirectly gives high praise to the Cats/SubMersives which I am keeping.  The Dunlavys are better in maybe one or two categories than the Seaton combo but other than that ......
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audioguy
For those of you who have or are planning on purchasing Seaton built stands for your catalysts,  I  found a trick to getting the Catalyst to fit in the exact center spot of the stand. (moving them around on the stand once they are placed on the stand is tricky at best with that rubber material that is used).  I use woodworking clamps to hold vertical 1 x 2's against the sides of the stands (sticking up about 2 inches above the top of the stand) on both sides and the back, covered them with protective material on the inside so I would not scratch the speaker as I put it into place and use them a guides as I place the speaker onto the stand.  Perfect alignment.
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audioguy
I decided to sand fill my new stands, not necessarily for acoustic reasons but rather to insure they stay put.   I spent hours making sure they were both EXACTLY in the right position (plus or minus 1/16 of an inch) because I knew once they were filled, moving them even the smallest amount would be "problematic" --- to say the least.

Make sure, if you choose to do this, that you use the bags that the stands came with and place them in the cavity of the stand --- for two reasons: (1) to make sure the sand does not find its way into places it should not go, and (2) much more importantly, my dry play box sand was not exactly "dry".  I did not want the moister of the sand to seep into the wood nor do I want any strange creatures hatching in there and making there way into my theater.

Each stand held two 50 pound bags with a small amount of space left over.  I then "sealed" the bag shut with as much packing tape as I could make use of and re-applied the top.

So we have 100 pounds of sand, 40 pounds of stand and 130 pounds of speaker.  These are NOT going anywhere

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