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sandbagger

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Reply with quote  #1 

 Ok, I was going to email this out with each kit, but thought this might work better.  I will post pictures later, but its pretty straight forward and really wont need them.

 

Some of this might be easier with a helper.

 The Rubber Gasket on the new driver is NOT used, I leave it on for shipping only to help protect the driver

1.  place sub on its back. remove the 4 hex screws holding the face plate. There are 4 rubber washers between the face plate and the sub front,  you will be replacing these with the nylon spacers provided.

2.  Remove the 8 screws holding the driver in.  This brings us to probably the hardest part, getting the driver out.  Since this driver is a bit lighter than the new one,  you can generally use a small screw driver and lift the edge and then get you finger under it.  or you can put something down to protect the edge and slide the screwdriver under it. If none of this works you can try placing the driver face down on the carpet or blanket and tap on the cabinet to get it loose.

3.  Lift the driver up and cut the wires. (you could also remove the amp first and just disconnect the wires from the amp.)

4.  Place the sub on its face. Remove all the screws holding in the amp and adjustment plates.

 

 IF either of the plates are hard to remove try using a razor blade and cut around the edge.

5. Remove the top plate and disconnect the ribbon cable connected to it

6. Remove amp, disconnecting the ribbon cable that goes to the top plate and then pulling the speaker leads out of the hole.

7.  Pull the ribbon cable out, you might have to fold the connector on one end over to get it through.

8.  Make all sealing surfaces flat as the screws will have pulled up some MDF up into the holes.  This is easily done with either sand paper, a large drill bit or countersink bit to just touch the holes, or even a razor knife.  It doesn't have to be perfect flat, just close as you will be putting gasket material down.

 

9.  Take the thin gasket material and place it around the rear plate holes.

10.  Place the top plate in place and use the 6 small screws, be careful not to over-tighten and stripping the threads out of the wood.  If you find any screws that will not tighten, a wood toothpick our match stick can be placed in the hole and then the screw will tighten.

11.  Take the bottom plate and install the binding posts , attach the wires.  Then place the wire through the bottom hole, make sure the wire is inside, then screw the plate down, again do not over-tighten, just good and snug should be fine.

12.  Place the sub on its back, placing something under it to protect the binding posts.

13.  Take the wider gasket material and place it on the cabinet first flattening the area around the old screw holes a knife or razor blade works good for this. 

14.  This is where some help would be nice, to make the connections to the driver.  Either have someone connect the wires as you hold the driver above the hole or place it on the face of the cabinet with something under it to protect the finish.   Connect the White wire to the red binding post and the Black to the Black post.

15.  Place the driver in the hole.  Yea easier said than done  I generally sit one side down and then with one hand holding the opposite side lower it till I am about 2" from the surface, then very quickly and carefully pull my fingers out and let it drop.  When you do this, you want to rotate the driver so the screw holes do not line up with existing holes.

16.  You can now move the driver around to center it in the opening, the hex key used on the face plate is normally about the right size to even the gap around the driver.  You will also want to drop the face plate on with the spacers and screws to make sure you are centered, you might also need to rotate the faceplate 180 as they are not all centered either.

17.  Screw the driver down, again tight is good, but not so tight you strip the holes out.

18.  The hard part is done now.

 

19.  Place the amp in your desired location, and hook up speaker wire.  I would recommend using 14g wire for short runs or 12g for long runs, and you can use either of the 2 pairs of binding posts on the rear of the amp, it does not matter.

20.  Switch setting on the rear of the amp:
Subsonic filter: doesnt matter as it is internally set. 
Bass Boost: Set to off, it is unmodified so its +3db@25hz 
Remote Turn On: Set it to your choice.

21. Front Settings: Gain, I have found that about 10 o'clock should be close.  FREQ, only works if using the L/R inputs and does nothing if using the LFE input, but set to 200hz if it amuses you. Phase, Start with it at zero, you will have to adjust based on individual settings.

22.  EQ, as far as initially I would zero it out, I like to do this by setting the FREQ and BANDWIDTH as low as possible, and setting the level to zero, I have found by testing that zero isn't exactly zero and needs to be just a tiny bit lower.(as in about -1)

 

I think that should just about do it.  If anyone has any other tips or think they have a better way to do something feel free to post it up along with any questions.


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Kevin
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alhull

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Reply with quote  #2 
Kevin - in step 15 you say " When you do this, you want to rotate the driver so the screw holes do not line up with existing holes."

So you are intentionally rotating the driver so that all the screw holes are over new solid wood on the face and then you'll be tapping brand new holes for the mounting screws?

Just asking to clarify this wasn't a typo on your part.

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Al
Josh

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Reply with quote  #3 
Correct.
bobbo7676

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Reply with quote  #4 
So I removed the driver and amp from my MFWs this weekend.  I have two rosewood MFWs from pretty late in the production cycle, and have a question on what I found when I removed the driver.

The driver was attached using the 8 screws, and the screw holes had tapped metal inserts in the holes for the screws to bite into.  The wood was also thickened at each one of these 8 locations.  It was about 1/2" thick at the screw locations and about 1/4" thick away from the screws.

Questions:
1.  Are all MFWs like this (metal inserts and locally thickened)?
2.  If so, why is it recommended that the new driver be rotated NOT to be installed in the existing screw holes?
3.  It seems it would be better for me to install the screws in the existing holes, since they are already prepped, the wood is thicker, etc.  Yes?

Thanks in advance
sandbagger

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Reply with quote  #5 
While I have 2 Rosewood cabs I have never pulled the drivers out, figured they all were the same.  When I get home tonight I will pull one apart.

1. From what I know ONLY the Rosewood cabinets from China are.
2. If you have metal inserts with machine screws please align with the old holes and reuse the machine screws!!! 
3. You need to use the old screws as the new ones are wood screws and the old ones are machine screws.  And yes this is the better way to go

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbo7676
So I removed the driver and amp from my MFWs this weekend.  I have two rosewood MFWs from pretty late in the production cycle, and have a question on what I found when I removed the driver.

The driver was attached using the 8 screws, and the screw holes had tapped metal inserts in the holes for the screws to bite into.  The wood was also thickened at each one of these 8 locations.  It was about 1/2" thick at the screw locations and about 1/4" thick away from the screws.

Questions:
1.  Are all MFWs like this (metal inserts and locally thickened)?
2.  If so, why is it recommended that the new driver be rotated NOT to be installed in the existing screw holes?
3.  It seems it would be better for me to install the screws in the existing holes, since they are already prepped, the wood is thicker, etc.  Yes?

Thanks in advance

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Mark_Seaton

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Reply with quote  #6 
As Kevin mentioned, the Rosewood cabinets were sourced from a different factory in China toward the end of the product life.  I wouldn't be surprised if they took some liberties in the assembly, but so long as the woofer recess is still larger than the MFW woofer frame, everything should fit fine.  (The larger recess around the MFW woofer was in fact included to both allow easier removal of the woofer and to allow a cast frame woofer if we ever offered an upgrade.

The same bolt pattern has worked in the past for both the MFW woofer basket & the 12 spoke frames, but that depends on a few factors, as they could be slightly different.  They should work fine, but do be aware when tightening.  If the screws get difficult to screw in, don't keep cranking, and check the alignment.  Best bet is to start with 2 screws at 180 deg to each other and get them finger tight, then tighten.  As with all woofers, you do not need to over-tighten, as you just damage the wood or woofer, and get no additional holding power.

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bobbo7676

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Reply with quote  #7 
Ok got it, thanks. If my existing machine screws aren't long enough or don't align right, then I'll go with the wood screws + rotating the woofer.

My tracking slip says they'll arrive tomorrow, so maybe I'll have some updates tomorrow evening.
calentz

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Reply with quote  #8 
If the screws are short, I think that getting longer screws would be a better solution. (And the inserts could not drop out)
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Reply with quote  #9 

Is it recommended to pre-drill the new holes for the wood screws?

sandbagger

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Reply with quote  #10 
I provide some very nice chisel point wood screws for MDF, they go in very nice and no need to pre drill them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by worduphod

Is it recommended to pre-drill the new holes for the wood screws?


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Kevin
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bobbo7676

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Reply with quote  #11 
Ok, some updates (lessons learned) from my Rosewood cabinet installation:

1. The recess for the woofer was not large enough on either of my cabinets.  Using a dremel/drum sander, I enlarged the radius about 1/8-3/16 all the way around.  The MDF was not hard to get through, but be careful when enlarging the hole.  I hit a couple of (what looked like) staples inside the MDF that shredded a couple of my sanding attachments, so be careful and don't forget eye protection.  EDIT:  I also had good success enlarging the hole with a utility knife if you don't have a dremel/sander.
2. After enlarging the recess, you need to pay EXTRA attention to aligning the woofer at the center of the hole since your cuts will most likely be uneven at some points (mine were).  I would recommend setting the woofer in the hole and then setting the face plate with the spacers on top BEFORE screwing your woofer into place.  That way you can see how far you are from the face plate and make adjustments easily.  My face plate was not 100% symmetrical, and fit up poorly one way, but fit up well when I rotated it 180 degrees.
3.  The pre-drilled bolt holes for the woofer seemed to align well with the new woofer, but they were at a slight angle and weren't actually perpendicular to the face of the wood (in the frame, not the woofer itself).  It was a really tight fit on some of them and others I couldn't get to go in.  I abandoned that idea and just used the screws Kevin provides in the set.  They worked great - if I had known that ahead of time, I wouldn't have even screwed (get it?) around with trying to use the bolts from the old woofer.

I could have saved myself a lot of time with these steps, so hopefully they can be of use to others!  Overall, the build quality is great and I am impressed with how well put-together everything is.  I should be firing them up over the weekend to give some initial impressions.
bobbo7676

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Reply with quote  #12 

Kevin,
Is there a standard distance that the face plate should be out away from the woofer?  I ended up with about 1/8" horizontal and 1/8" vertical clearance at my worst point since I'm not 100% centered on the hole.  I just want to make sure the woofer isn't going to bang on the face plate when I really get them going.

Thanks!

sandbagger

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Reply with quote  #13 
Bobbo

Sounds about perfect, even a little less than that would have been ok.

Any movement of the cone actually makes the surround pull inward and away from the faceplate and only in VERY LARGE excursions could I get it to make any noise when it was a business card thickness gap, so the 1/8" is great.

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Kevin
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merino

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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks for the tips bobbo7676, they did help. I will further add/expand upon for any other rosewood cabinet owners (I did my two yesterday) -

Definitely ignore the metric bolts. They're a tight fit just to get through the mounting holes in the driver before it's in the cabinet, much less screw in to place.

The only place I ran into staples was in the middle of the left and right sides, where the edge of the driver hole is closest to the edge of the cabinet, within an inch or two of the exact middle. You may run into staples elsewhere of course, but if you sand those particular areas down slowly and listen for a change in noise you can keep your sanding wheel casualties to a minimum. I sanded those down as much as I could without removing the staple or grinding through them intentionally, and it was a tight fit on those edges, but there was still a bit of wiggle room.

Assuming you pull out the pink filler material to avoid getting sawdust on it, make sure you put it back in before you start screwing the driver down!
LeeH

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Reply with quote  #15 

Just got my package yesterday and started looking at the pieces this morning.  When attaching the wire to binding post, those would be soldered, wouldn't they or am I missing something?  I didn't notice any other way to connect them

sandbagger

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Reply with quote  #16 
I have changed those to slide on spade connectors but they use to be soldered.  Black wire for the Black terminal, White wire on the RED terminal The bare end of the wires are for the driver.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeH

Just got my package yesterday and started looking at the pieces this morning.  When attaching the wire to binding post, those would be soldered, wouldn't they or am I missing something?  I didn't notice any other way to connect them


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LeeH

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Reply with quote  #17 
Ahaaaa!.  First glance, the spade connectors didnt look like they fit but apparently they do.

Also, am surprised I havent seen any comments from folks who have completed the installs.

Thanks

Lee
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Reply with quote  #18 
I have an additional question regarding the spacers for the faceplate.

My faceplate has some rubber spacers now.  Should your spacers replace those or are they in addition?

Lee
sandbagger

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Reply with quote  #19 
Replace

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeH
I have an additional question regarding the spacers for the faceplate.

My faceplate has some rubber spacers now.  Should your spacers replace those or are they in addition?

Lee

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Kevin
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SoCalWJS

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Reply with quote  #20 
I am happy to say that I finally got this!!!!!!

Very hopeful and looking forward to the results.

I will say, however, that this is not going very well.

Got the woofer out with virtually no problem. The rest is being a real PItA.

It took quite awhile, but I finally got the control panel out after a good 20+ minutes of running around the edges with a razor knife. The plate amp, however, refuses to budge. I've gone around the outside dozens of times with 2 different razor knives and a narrow flat headed screwdriver. Between a bad back and arthritic knees, working on the floor is taking it's toll.

Ah well. Slow and steady persistance will surely result in ultimate victory!!!





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